CATS Assignment – Comparison of two influential journalists – Essay

Kate Adie and Rageh Omaar.

I have chosen these two journalists, as their careers featured in news bulletins from my formative years.  Even though they were born in different parts of the world, educated differently, and started their media careers in different ways, their work has followed a similar path during conflicts and wars.

Kate Adie was born in Northumberland, England, and started her media career in local radio after completing her degree in Scandinavian Studies at Newcastle University.  Her first roles came at BBC Radio Durham and BBC Radio Bristol, which led to a move into reporting for television in Southampton [Rock, 2013].  She then moved to cover network BBC News in 1979.  Her career with the BBC continued until 2003, and she covered various worldwide conflicts and battles, as well as in the UK. [Swan Helennic, CV]

She was the journalist outside the Iranian Embassy Hijacking when the Special Air Service (SAS) stormed the building after 6 days of stalemate in April and May 1980. This was a stepping stone for her, climbing the ranks within BBC News, eventually becoming Chief News Correspondent.  Her significant stories include the downing of the PanAm Flight 103, the American Bombing of Libya, the First Gulf War, Bosnia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and the student uprising in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square before becoming a freelance journalist.[Rock, 2013]  During her time as a journalist, she was arrested in Belgrade trying to research material about General Tito. [BBC, 2010]

Whereas Kate Adie was a prominent member of the BBC’s news team for the First Gulf War [IWMF, 2011], Rageh Omaar was a high profile journalist in the second Iraqi invasion.

Rageh Omaar was born in Mogadishu, Somalia in 1967, and moved to the UK, aged 2.  Educated at New College Oxford, where he read Modern History, his journalism journey started with print based The Voice as a trainee in 1991. He moved to Ethiopia a year later, where he was a freelance journalist, mainly working for BBC World Service. His role for the BBC continued as Chief Africa Correspondent, prior to the start of the Iraq Invasion. [BBC, 2002]

During that conflict, his coverage was seen on BBC News, and around the world on BBC World News, further enhancing his reputation as Senior Foreign Correspondent.  After leaving the BBC in 2006, he worked for Al-Jazeera, [Independent, 2006] before returning to the UK in 2013, becoming special correspondent for Independent Television News (ITN), and is currently their International Affairs Editor. [ITN, 2015]

These two journalists have continued to help form and shape the way in which the journalists of today, cover conflicts and uprisings around the world.

Kate Adie blazed a trail for female journalists in general, but more especially within the confines of a war zone.  Prior to her career, women journalists were rarely seen in places such as The Gulf, and Beijing, but thanks to her tough, no-nonsense approach, she was at the forefront of news reporting during her time at the BBC.

Adie uses her camera on the ground, and isn’t afraid to get in the crowds, as is demonstrated in her coverage from Tiananmen Square, Beijing. [Kate Adie, BBC, 1989] . By using very striking visuals shot on location, and her pieces to camera, she brought world news events to an audience who were shocked by the events, whereas now, audiences are more likely to be desensitized to the events that take place from across the world.  This is also true for Omaar, in his coverage of the toppling of Saddam Hussain’s statue in Baghdad.  Striking visuals, working with the crowd, whilst delivering a piece to camera. [Rageh Omaar, Baghdad 2003]

Adie’s voiceover pieces use elaborate, flowery language, but this adds depth and gravitas to the video and are delivered in a calm voice.  Whereas her pieces recorded in front of the camera, have her voice stronger in its delivery, to get across to the severity of the situation that is being covered.

Earlier in her career, Adie covered the US bombing of Tripoli in Libya, and is seen reporting from the scene of a bombing, wearing very little armoured protection.  She tries to get across to the audience the human element of, what is a very grave situation, where people have been injured and have died, bringing it to the homes of the audience.  This is in stark contrast to Omaar, who wore full protection, but Health and Safety has become a part of video journalism.

As Kate Adie was coming to the end of her BBC career, and moving into freelance work and becoming an author, Rageh Omaar was being seen covering his own stories, firstly as the BBC’s Africa correspondent, but it was with the start of the second Gulf War in 2003, that Omaar became a regular face on BBC news coverage, which was then subsequently syndicated around the world. [Fox, K, 2006]

Omaar was keen to deny reports that he was the new Kate Adie, he recognised the similarity in their roles, but replied “I don’t know about that. But I’m not the old Rageh Omaar.” [BBC, 2003]

Rageh Omaar’s brand of journalism was refreshing for the time, in the same way that Adie brought her own perspective to reporting.

Being of African parentage, his understanding of issues from other parts of the world was a great asset to understanding other cultures and customs, and allowed him to access areas that may have been difficult to other journalists.  Fluent in Arabic, this undoubtedly helped to communicate with the Iraqis during the conflict.[BBC, 2002]

His journalism style is very similar to that of Kate Adie, in that he is willing to get in amongst the battles, attempting to tell the story in an accessible way for the audience, and doesn’t speak down to the viewer.

In a piece for the BBC, the way in which Omaar covers a story, the toppling of the statue of Saddam Hussain in Fardus Square, Baghdad, in a very calm and measured way, even though the crowd around him are visibly excited by the events happening.

Omaar and Adie reflect on their time covering the Gulf Wars with a sense of frustration.  Adie is quoted as saying “I’ve seen a complete erosion of any kind of acknowledgement that reporters should be able to report as they witness” [Anderson, 2003], and Omaar talked in 2008 of Iraq as a “a contradiction – it is still the most important international news story, but the continuing violence and insecurity have also made it an information abyss.” [Omaar, 2008]

Frustration at attempting to tell a story, when you’re not being given all the information you require.  The socio-political impact of this is that the audience are being given only half the story.  By showing positive propaganda, it makes the war on the ground seem better than the actual truth.  A situation similar to the Vietnam War, and the footage being shown to the US audience.

These two journalists have come from very different backgrounds, but there seems to be a hard-nosed attitude to provide the viewer with hard-hitting journalism, even if they may seem frustrated by the control held over them by the Armed Forces, and maybe even a little bit of editorial control by their employer. [Controversial Images, 2012]

Their backgrounds are worth reflecting on, to see where these tough, investigative journalists started from, to see if this had any effect on where they are today.

Adie was given up for adoption by her mother, after falling pregnant whilst her husband was away on National Service.  Her adoptive parents, were a pharmacist and his wife from Sunderland, England.  During her childhood, she was described as a shy child, but this may have been due to her deafness. [Grice, E, 2005]

Omaar was born into a wealthy family from Somaliland, in the north-west of Somalia.  He moved to the UK aged 2, and was educated in independent schools in Oxford and Gloucester. [Prime Performers, 2015]

Their formative years don’t seem to have much correlation, but what stands out in their careers, is their ability to find stories, bring them to the audience, and, to a certain degree, being in the right place at the right time.

These two correspondents worked a few years apart, but the way in which news is reported has changed.  The news outlets for Kate Adie were the lunchtime and evening bulletins, where as with Rageh Omaar, news coverage was accessible 24 hours a day via BBC News 24, and around the world, as his work was syndicated in America.  Their paths to video news journalism started from very different media, Adie taking the radio route, and Omaar starting in print, but they both ended up in the same places reporting the facts. [BBC, 2010 Adie] [BBC, 2002 Omaar]

What stands out is that their ideals still hold true, no matter what their starting point.  They just wanted to relate the story, even though it was from places that the audience may not have knowledge about.  The willingness to put their lives and safety at risk to cover a story, is what drives and connects these two journalists.

They are also linked by story telling away from traditional journalism.  Both have become authors in their own right, Adie writing about the role of women in World War 1,[Hodder & Stoughton 2015] and Omaar describing his life growing up as a Muslim and writing about his experiences in Iraq. [Jardine, 2006]

Their names are held in reverence in journalism circles, and the current journalists covering these stories today have a lot to live up to in terms of content and determination to show the true nature of war.

When viewing their work, you can see that they work to get show how grave a situation is, with careful use of crowd scenes, showing troops on the ground if possible, and speak directly to the camera, but ensuring that they relate situations to the audience, rather than just lecturing.

Their use of camera angles is important to the gravity of the situation.  For example, in Rageh Omaar’s piece in Baghdad, the camera is set low, looking up at the tank that is rumbling past.  It gives the feel of a young child looking up at a monster, and children were not immune to the suffering within Iraq.  Kate Adie’s video from Beijing is shot in very low light as it is late in the evening, with just the artificial light of the street, and the fireglow to use.  This is an attempt to show the dark nature of the situation during the Student Uprising.

By relating the situation, they work with local people, attempting to get their side of the story, if possible, given that they are embedded with the soldiers fighting the battle.  Working with the local people, it demonstrates that they are trying to relate the whole story, even when there are hurdles preventing the full story being shown.

Like so many journalists before them, and, no doubt other journalists to come, their passion for telling a story in a way that is accessible by the general public.  The British troops on the ground in the war zones were quoted as saying that if Kate Adie was being sent to cover the story, then things were being perceived as a very serious situation.

Rageh Omaar is a journalist who, is held in the same esteem. He is a journalist that has gone from a Black African newspaper, to covering stories from around the world, and his work with the BBC, ITN, and Al-Jazeera is one that the great John Pilger covered in his documentary “The War You Don’t See”. [Communications B, 2015]

Their work still holds gravitas throughout the journalism world, and drives many journalists on today. to ensure that the truth is reported, in a fair, accurate and contemporaneous way to the widest possible audience.

They both treat the subject with humanity and respect, and also extend that courtesy to the audience. Their ability to look objectively at some of the most horrific situations from around the world, come across when viewing news broadcast footage from their careers.

However, they both felt compelled to leave the BBC, where their work came to prominence, to forge their own paths.

Their work is so well-respected within the industry, that they were able to carve out their reputation as names of great war journalists and correspondents, and that their names were known for being great journalists, rather than just being BBC journalists who happened to be sent to cover the wars and conflicts. [Press Gazette, 2013 Omaar] [CredoReference, 2014 Adie]

A true journalist always wants to convey the truth to the audience, and these two journalists have inspired me over the years with their work around the world.  By facing difficult situations, and bringing their humanity across via the camera and their written words, many have followed their work intently.

Their work, continues to inspire and help to shape the journalists and reporters as the media moves forward with established 24 hour news, the constant updating of online news and the increased use of social media.    For example, when viewing the work of Caroline Wyatt at the BBC, you see the influence that Omaar and Adie have had on the style and presentation of the news pieces. [BBC, 2015].

Without their influence, reporting, comment and help to shape the journalists of the future, the sociopolitical impact of wars and conflicts wouldn’t be as striking.  In news reporting today, you see skills and techniques these two journalists pioneered many years ago. The audience, reporters and correspondents are able to learn from their work for many years to come.

 

CATS Assignment – Comparison of Two Influential Journalists – 1st Draft

Kate Adie and Rageh Omaar.

Kate Adie

Kate Adie

Kate Adie was born in Northumberland, England, and started out on her media career in local radio journalism after completing her degree in Scandinavian Studies at Newcastle University.  Her first media roles came at BBC Radio Durham, and BBC Radio Bristol, and these led to a move into reporting for local television.  These forays into the media led to a move to cover network BBC News in 1979.  Her career with the BBC continued until 2003, and in that time, she covered various conflicts and battles around the world, as well as some more closer to home.

She was the journalist on the scene outside the Iranian Embassy Hijacking when the Special Air Service (SAS) stormed the building after 6 days of stalemate in April and May 1980. That proved to be a crucial stepping stone to Kate Adie, climbing the ranks within the BBC news department, eventually to become their Chief News Correspondent.  She covered a range of significant stories at home including the downing of the Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and around the world including the American Bombing of Libya, the First Gulf War, Bosnia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and the student uprising and protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square before becoming a freelance journalist.  She was awarded an OBE in 1993 for her services to journalism.

During her time as a journalist, she has even been arrested, during her time in Belgrade trying to research and gather material about General Tito, who was a statesman, Prime Minister, and held the office as the President of Yugoslavia between 1953 and 1980.

Whereas Kate Adie was a prominent member of the BBC’s news team for the First Gulf War, Rageh Omaar was a very high profile journalist in the second invasion of Iraq.

Rageh Omaar

Rageh Omaar

 

Rageh Omaar was born in Mogadishu, Somalia in 1967, and moved to the United Kingdom at the age of 2.  He was educated at New College Oxford, where he read Modern History.  His journalism journey started with print based The Voice as a trainee in 1991, and he moved to Ethiopia a year later, where he was a freelance journalist, mainly working for BBC World Service. His roles for the BBC subsequently continued as the Chief Correspondent for Africa, before the start of the Iraq Invasion in 2003.

During that conflict, his coverage was seen in the UK on BBC News, and also widely around the world on BBC World News, further enhancing his reputation as a Senior Foreign Correspondent.  After leaving the BBC in 2006, he worked for Al-Jazeera, before returning to the United Kingdom, becoming special correspondent for Independent Television News (ITN), and is currently their International Affairs Editor.

In my opinion, these two journalists have helped to form and shape the way in which the journalists of today cover conflicts, wars and uprisings from around the world.

Kate Adie blazed a trail for female journalists in general, but more especially within the confines of a war zone.  Prior to her career, women journalists were rarely seen in places such as The Gulf Sardinia and Beijing, but thanks to her tough no-nonsense approach, she was at the forefront of foreign news reporting during her time at the BBC.

Adie uses her camera on the ground, and isn’t afraid to get in within the crowds, as is shown in this clip from the student uprising in Tiananmen Square, Beijing.  By using very striking visuals shot on location, together with her pieces to camera, she brought news events from around the world to an audience who were shocked by the events going on, whereas now, in 2015, audiences are more likely to be desensitized to the events that take place from all four corners of the world.  Her voiceover pieces use elaborate, some would say, flowery language, but this is to add depth and gravitas to the images recorded and are delivered in a very calm voice.  Whereas her pieces recorded in front of the camera, have her voice much stronger in its delivery, to get across to the audience the severity of the situation that is being covered.

Earlier in her career, Adie covered the US bombing of Tripoli in Libya, and in this clip, she is seen reporting from the scene of a bombing, wearing very little protection in terms of flak jackets and armour.  She tries to get across to the audience the human element of, what is a very grave situation, where people have been injured and have died, bringing it to the sitting rooms of the audience.

As Kate Adie was coming to the end of her BBC career, and moving into freelance work and becoming an author, Rageh Omaar was being seen covering his own stories, firstly as the BBC’s Africa correspondent, but it was with the start of the second Gulf War in 2003, that Omaar started to become a regular face on news coverage for the BBC, which was then subsequently syndicated around the world.

Omaar was keen to deny reports in 2003 that he was the new Kate Adie, he recognised the similarity in their roles, but simply replied “I don’t know about that. But I’m not the old Rageh Omaar.”

Rageh Omaar’s brand of journalism was refreshing for the time, in the same way that Adie brought her own perspective to reporting.

Being of African parentage, his understanding of issues from other parts of the world was a great asset to understanding other cultures and their customs, and allowed him to access areas that may have been more difficult to other journalists.  As he is fluent in Arabic, this undoubtedly helped to communicate with the Iraqis during the conflict.

His journalism style is very similar to that of Kate Adie, in that he is willing to get in amongst the battles, attempting to tell the story in a way that is very accessible to the audience, and does not speak down to the viewer.

In this video for the BBC, you can see the way in which Omaar covers a story, the toppling of the statue of Saddam Hussain in Fardus Square, Baghdad, in a very calm and measured way, even though the crowd around him are visibly excited by the events that are about to occur.

Omaar reflects on his time covering the Gulf War with a sense of frustration, that he didn’t always get the best opportunity to cover the true nature of the war, due to him being embedded with the troops.

These two journalists have come from very different backgrounds, but there does seem to be a hard-nosed attitude to provide the viewer with hard-hitting journalism, even if they may seem frustrated by the control held over them by the Armed Forces, and maybe even a little bit of editorial control by their then employer.

Their backgrounds are worth reflecting on, to see where these tough, investigative journalists started out from, to see if this has had any effect on where they are today.

Adie was given up for adoption by her mother, after falling pregnant whilst her husband was away doing his National Service.  Her adoptive parents, were a pharmacist and his wife from the northern city of Sunderland, England.  During her childhood, she was described as a shy child, but this may have in part, been due to her deafness.

Omaar was born into a wealthy family from the region of Somaliland, which is in the north-west of Somalia.  He moved to the UK aged 2, and was educated in independent schools in Oxford and Gloucester, England.

Their formative years do not seem to have much correlation, but what stands out in their careers, is their ability to find out stories, bring them to the audience, and, to a certain degree, being in the right place at the right time.

These two correspondents worked just a few years apart, but the way in which news is reported has changed hugely.  The news outlets for Kate Adie were on the lunchtime and evening bulletins, where as with Rageh Omaar, the horizon had changed, with news coverage being accessible 24 hours a day via BBC News 24, and also around the world, as his work was syndicated in America.  Their paths to video news journalism started from very different media, Adie taking the radio route to television, and Omaar starting in print journalism, but they both ended up in the same places reporting the facts.

What stands out for me is that their ideals still hold true no matter from what their starting point was.  They just wanted to relate the story to the audience, even though it was from many corners of the world that the audience may not have much in-depth knowledge about.  The willingness to put their lives and own safety at risk to cover a story, is what drives and connects these two excellent journalists.

They are also linked by the outlet of story telling away from traditional journalism.  Both have become authors in their own right, Adie writing about the role of women in World War 1, and Omaar describing his life growing up as a Muslim.

Their names are held in reverence in journalism circles, and the current crop of journalists covering these stories today have a lot to live up to in terms of content, guts and determination to show the true nature of war and war zones.

Like so many journalists before them, and, no doubt other journalists to come, their passion for telling a story in a way that is accessible by the general public.  The British troops on the ground in the war zones were quoted as saying that if Kate Adie was being sent to cover the story, then things were being perceived as a very serious situation.

Rageh Omaar is a journalist who, is held in the same esteem. He is a journalist that had gone from a Black African newspaper, to covering stories from around the world, and his work with the BBC, ITN, and Al-Jazeera is one that the great John Pilger covered in his documentary “The War You Don’t See”.

Their work still holds gravitas throughout the journalism world, and drives many journalists on today. to ensure that the truth is reported, in a fair, accurate and contemporaneous way to the widest possible audience.

They both treat the subject with humanity and respect, and also extend that courtesy to the audience. Their ability to look objectively at some of the most horrific situations from around the world, come across when viewing news broadcast footage from their careers.

However, they both felt compelled to leave the BBC, where their work came to prominence, to forge their own paths, and I feel that is one of the greatest compliments to each of them.  Their work is so well-respected within the industry, that they were able to carve out their reputation as names of great war journalists and correspondents, and that their names were known for being great journalists, rather than just being BBC journalists who happened to be sent to cover the wars and conflicts.

A true journalist always wants to convey the truth to the audience, and these two journalists have inspired me over the years with their work around the world.  By facing difficult situations, and bringing their humanity across via the camera and their written words, I, amongst other have followed their work intently.

Their work, continues to inspire and help to shape the journalists and reporters as the media moves forward with established 24 hour news, the constant updating of online news and the increased use of social media.  Without their influence, their reporting and comment, and their help to shape the journalists of the future. the sociopolitical impact of wars and conflicts would not be as striking.  In news reporting today, you see the skills and techniques that these two journalists pioneered many years ago, and I hope that the audience and future reporters and correspondents are able to learn from the record of their work for many years to come.

 

 

CATS Assignment – Initial Thoughts

Comparing two journalists in 2000 words to an outsider, sounds like an easy task, however the first step is to select two journalists, and that is proving more tricky that I initially thought.

The main issue for me, is choosing two from the wealth of journalistic talent that has gone before.

As part of the guidance issued, we have been told to think carefully about the range of work that is accessible.  Journalists from the early 20th century may not be as easy to work with as their work may be less in-depth than say war journalists from Vietnam, or political journalists from the last 20 years.

Over the next few weeks, I will be looking at various journalists that have “made a difference” to outcomes in their field, and comparing and contrasting the things that they have influenced, either in terms of Governments or the general public.

I have initially looked at the work of war journalists Don McCullin, Max Hastings, Orla Guerin, Rageh Omar and Martin Bell, who have all covered their craft in different ways. I need to ensure that I focus on the difference they have made to public perceptions of their coverage.

Look North – Video News Packages

I have viewed many editions of BBC Look North, which is broadcast from Hull weeknights at 6.30pm.  It features news from the East Riding and Hull on the north bank of the Humber, and south of the Humber, caters for an audience that stretches from Barton, Grimsby and Scunthorpe, as far south as the Wash, and North Norfolk.

The main presenter of the programme is Peter Levy, who has presented Look North, since the programme split it’s content between Leeds and Hull, late in 2002.

In my opinion, the programme takes the format of being topical with serious news, but also caters for the lighter aspects with a feeling of being comfortable and welcoming the audience, without being patronising and condescending.

After the main news has handed over to the regions, there is a welcome from Peter, who briefly explains what is to come in the next 30 minutes, with little pieces of VT from contributors, which can include members of the public, other journalists in the Look North team, and also a little weather soundbite from the meteorologist.

Once these items have been shown, the main titles roll, which attempt to include all main areas of the region by way of images, and names of the larger towns and cities across the area.

The presenter will then explain the main story of the evening, with a VT in the background, which can include pictures, and infographics.  The presenter will either introduce a piece of pre-recorded VT, or hand over to a presenter in a relevant area for the story.  If the programme uses VT, then it generally plays until the journalist signs off with their name, programme name, and location.  If it is a live link, then the on-site journalist will do a piece to camera, either as a front on shot, with a relevant backdrop, for example, a company that is in the news, or a general location shot, if the news story is about a town/village.

After the VT/Outdoor piece has concluded, the main presenter will continue with their piece to camera, and on occasion, may then bring in another guest for response or comment.

I have noticed many different ways in which the presenter and journalists can approach a story.

A programme can be made up of one or more of the following.

  • Main presenter – Seated behind a desk – Front on to camera – Slightly offset on screen.
  • Main presenter – Seated behind a desk to one side with screen over left shoulder.
  • Main presenter – Stood in front of a large screen, to introduce infographics
  • Main presenter – Slightly relaxed, one arm on desk, engaging audience (Social Media etc)
  • Main presenter – Slightly relaxed, wider screen shot, (Reading emails, tweets)
  • Correspondent – Stood in front of large screen
  • Live O/B – Split screen with presenter on left and correspondent on right.
  • Live O/B or Pre-recorded V/T- Correspondent in front of location relevant to story – Screen position left/right or centre.
  • Live O/B or Pre-recorded V/T- Piece to camera with interviewee(s)
  • Pre-recorded V/T – Talking whilst walking towards the camera.
  • Pre-recorded V/T – Video of events, combined with interviews and/or correspondent piece to camera.

Different camera angles can be used, for example a close up shot of an interviewee is relevant to a story featuring emotion.  Whereas a wide angle shot, can demonstrate how busy or quiet an area can be.  If children are in shot, such as a story about schools/education, then depending on permissions or the type of story, faces may have to be obscured.

By using a wide variety of the shots highlighted above, makes for a more intimate programme, rather than older news bulletins that talked at the audience, rather than engaging with them.

CATS Reflection – Camilla Stephan and Klavs Bo Christensen

The two photo journalists that I have selected are both very good at what they do.  They portray difficult social situations, showing the humanity in the shots they select, and the way in which they are framed.  I took the deliberate decision to select a journalist from either gender, to see how the different sexes approach a story.

Their photos are very similar in style as both use black and white photography to show the stark reality of poverty, drug addiction, and being abandoned by society, and this means that it has much more impact than if the images were in full colour.

One of the main differences between their work is that Camilla tends to feature a younger subject, where as Klavs showcases adults who are on the fringes of society, but given this, they still encapsulate the trials and tribulations of different areas of the world.  Klavs work also has portfolio shots where the subject has posed in front of the camera, where as Camilla’s seem to be in a more candid style, taken on the fly rather than staged.

Featuring cultures far removed from their own roots, Camilla and Klavs have shown that there is suffering out there that doesn’t always get reported within mainstream journalism, and have done so with a level of understanding and support that is not always prevalent in other forms of media.

As a journalist, I admire their drive and determination to show these difficult subjects that don’t get the full attention that they deserve.

Comparison of one high profile news story – 22nd October 2014

I am comparing the same news event from different news streams from around the 22nd October 2014.

The news item is regarding the announcement that Doctors will be offered an extra payment of £55 for an early diagnosis of dementia in patients that they have within their surgeries.

The Daily Mirror featured the article on the front page, but only as a small side piece to their main article regarding a men who faked a coma to avoid a court case. Their wording of the payment as a “bribe” could be seen as an inflammatory comment to some of their readers, but it grabs the attention, and as the front page article is a short one, this is designed to get the reader to go within the newspaper to Page 5. Once the reader has being lured in, the article continues on a side bar, and again plays second fiddle to the same story as on the front page.

The Times, as with the Daily Mirror features the article on the front page, but in more detail, with the piece continuing onto Page 2. There is more detail in the piece, with careful use of statistics. There is also a link to the current Government targets, and does seem to be a more considered piece, using more expert opinion, so as to not scare their demographic.

On Twitter, the user comments are a lot more scathing of the scheme, with at least one contributor saying that it is a money making scheme for the GP’s and their surgeries.

Sky News and BBC News covered the issue in a very similar way. They both reported the facts, in a similar way to The Times coverage. Sky News Online predominantly used quotes from health professionals, with a little analysis, whereas the balance on BBC News Online was the reverse.

One consistent that was picked up by all outlets I researched was the phrase “ethical travesty” which was spoken by Dr Iona Heath, the ex-president of the Royal College of GP’s.

All major outlets reported the facts, which from a journalistic point of view is exactly what I expected, but the red tops used stronger language to get their point across.