Research and chart the rise of media consumption on mobile platforms.

According to research from Deloitte, the number of UK Households that own a tablet has risen from around 10% in 2012 to 71% in 2015, and households that own at least one smartphone has risen from around 50% to 83% in the same period. (Deloitte)

This increase in mobile device usage co-incides with increased numbers of superfast 4G mobile phone networks contracts, and faster home broadband speed.

During 2014, the number of 4G mobile phone consumers increased from 2.7 million to 23.6 million users (Media.ofcom.org.uk)

The ABC figures for The Times showed that the average print sales figure per day was 404,155 copies (The Times Of London (Print Edition)for it’s Monday to Saturday output, whereas the tablet readership was 84,059 across the three main devices, Ipad, Android, and Kindle. (The Times Of London (Tablet Edition))

These figures quantified by The National Readership Survey (NRS) which states that 531,000 devices access The Times via Tablet or Mobile devices.  The NRS figures also include people who may have accessed the newspaper either via a desktop connection or by printed copy. (Nrs.co.uk)

 

 

Deloitte,. Media Consumer 2015: The Signal And The Noise. Deloitte, 2016. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Media.ofcom.org.uk,. “The UK Is Now A Smartphone Society”. N.p., 2015. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Nrs.co.uk,. “Topline Results | National Readership Survey”. N.p., 2016. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

The Times Of London (Print Edition). 1st ed. ABC, 2016. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

The Times Of London (Tablet Edition). 1st ed. London: ABC, 2016. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

CATS Reflection – 2/3 – Will The New Day herald a new age in Print Journalism

The first new printed newspaper in 6 years has launched with Trinity Mirror offering The New Day.  The previous newcomer to the market was the “i”, which was a spin off from the Independent.

Some in the industry believe that there is a reason why no new national newspaper has launched in that time for a variety of reasons.  More people consume their news online, and printed newspaper sales in the UK have has a general decline in sales, when you factor out the very aggressive price battles over the last few years.

The New Day - Launch Issue

The New Day – Launch Issue

Trinity Mirror have tried to differentate their product from the rest of the market by using different elements to newspaper production.  The paper on which The New Day is printed on is a higher quality than other newspapers within its sector, and there is a lot of “white space” in it’s output.

The publishers have deliberately tried to make it an easy read and comparisons can be drawn with the position in which the “i” is pitched in the market.

Whether the newspaper can make a difference in the market remains to be seen, but I feel that the launch is a very brave one in a market that is slowly declining.

A newspaper that has taken a deliberate stance of having no content website, only a presence on Social Media is one that could alienate the very people they need to buy the printed newspaper.

The first edition was given away for free, and currently is being sold for 25 pence, which is being trailed as half the usual price of 50 pence.

I guess time will tell, but people will need to buy the newspaper in order for it to succeed.  In my opinion, Trinity Mirror will pull the plug on a product that does not stand up on it’s own.

CATS Reflection – 3/2 – IPSO and OFCOM Codes

As a journalist, either in print or broadcast, I must be conversant with both IPSO and OFCOM codes in what I produce.

IPSO are responsible for print journalism products, and OFCOM in broadcast, and although their codes are weighty in content, everything done within the journalism industry ultimately is governed by that.

During our session we looked through each of the codes, and discussed the implications for any content that is created.

IPSOeditorscode

IPSO Code

OfcomBroadcast

Ofcom Broadcast Code

Although journalists are not expected to know the codes word for word, it is vitally important that anyone who produces work meets the standards expected by these two organisations.

Whether in my professional or personal life, be that out and about, or on social media, I will be keeping these important guidelines in mind, because there are people out there who will deliberately undermine you in your career, and could quote these codes at you, or even worse in a court of law.

Companies and individuals who fall foul of the codes can be subject to serious sanctions in terms of fines or in a worst case scenario, imprisonment.

CATS Reflection – Police and Crime Reporting

As part of the CATS sessions, journalists covering Crime and the Police was discussed.  A crime correspondent is held as one of the highly regarded positions within local and national newspapers.

Covering news from Police authorities is something that has to be dealt with delicately, and can be fraught with difficulties, both in terms of level of content, and a careful eye kept on the legalities of reporting.

Structure of the Police

The Police are now accountable to a local Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC), who are directly elected as part of elections every 4 years, using the Supplementary Vote system.

Locally, Hull is covered by the Humberside Police force, and in the 2012 Police and Crime Commissioner Elections, Matthew Grove was elected with a majority of 2,231, over John Prescott.  During the vote, Grove gained 3,842 votes than Prescott, but as part of the voting system, Grove gained the position.  It has to be noted that the turnout for the vote was 19.15 per cent of the total electorate within the Humberside Police force area.

The next round of PCC elections will take place on 5 May 2016, the same day as Local Council elections in England and Wales.

The Police have a variety of roles, from full-time uniformed and plain clothed officers, special constables, and Police Community Support Officers (PCSO).  I am looking at the different roles within the Police Forces across England and Wales, and the rules for other parts of the United Kingdom can vary by area.

PCSO

PCSO’s were introduced in 2002, initially by the Metropolitan Police, and are classed as uniformed civilian police support staff.  They serve within Safer Neighbourhood or Neighbourhood Policing Teams, and have a specific remit to provide high visibility policing, dealing with anti-social behaviour, minor offences and intelligence gathering.

They do not have the same powers as other police officers, for example, they are unable to make a police arrest, only a citizen’s arrest, under section 24A of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984.

According to Government Statistics published in July 2015, there were equivalent to 12,331 full-time PCSO’s across the 43 police forces of England and Wales.

Special Constables

Special Constables are members of a Police Constabulary, and in most cases, do not receive remuneration for their services.  Some constabularies are experimenting with paying their Special Constables.  The commitment as a “Special” is for a minimum of 16 hours service over a 4 week period.

They have full police powers, and can be promoted within the ranks, starting at Constable level, and can work their way up to the rank of Chief Officer of the Special Constabulary.

According to Government Statistics published in July 2015, there were equivalent to 16,101 full time members of the Special Constabulary across the 43 police forces of England and Wales.

Police Officers

Police Officers are employed by individual constabularies.  These constabularies are all governed by and accountable to Her Majesty’s Inspectorates of Constabulary.

Officers are organised by rank, and are uniform across England and Wales, except for the 2 forces that cover London, City of London Police and the Metropolitan Police.  The ranks are Constable, Sergeant, Inspector, Chief Inspector, Superintendent, and Chief Superintendent.  The highest rank across the 41 forces outside London is Chief Constable, and within the Capital, it is Commissioner.

According to Government Statistics published in July 2015, there were equivalent to 126,818 full time Police Officers across the 43 police forces of England and Wales.

Covering Stories involving the Police

When working as a journalist, I feel it is good practice to have a positive working relationship with the Police, without it being too overbearing.  The Police have their own press office for releasing information that will assist with the day-to-day running of the Police Force, and will need to work with journalists, in TV, Radio, Print and Online media.

I have discussed with my peers about the relationship between the Media and the Police, and it is very much a two way street.  We need the Police, but they also need the media to assist with accurate reporting of events, appeals for assistance in catching criminals, or, in the event of a major incident, getting the information out to the members of the public.

At the end of the day, we all have a job to do, so both sides must conduct themselves professionally, even if that causes a little friction.  The Police may withhold information from the Media about an ongoing investigation, but will have a very good reason for doing so.

Making contacts within the Police Force is a very important way of building a relationship, be that with serving or retired officers.  Working with serving officers may enable a journalist to get a tip off on a story that is going to break in the near future, and nurturing the relationship, will put you ahead of other media outlets that may just use the Police Press Releases.

In addition to the Press Office, there are many other outlets that the Police have to get information out into the “real world”.  For example, many police officers have their own official Twitter accounts, and there are websites for Local Neighbourhood Policing Teams.  The website for my local Neighbourhood Policing Team, Myton, has it’s own page on the Humberside Police website, that lists news and information about the area, together with a list of all Police Officers and PCSO’s.

Another key piece of advice I have learnt from the course, is to know what you can and cannot do legally, at crime scenes, and report on in the various media outlets.  If in doubt, check with senior journalists, lawyers, and refer to your handy copy of McNae’s Essential Law for Journalists.

 

CATS Reflection – Official Secrets Act

In the CATS session, the subject was the Official Secrets Act.

The Official Secrets Act is something that I’ve heard about within journalism for a while, but I had never really looked into it, what it means, what it covers, and how long it has been in existence.

Initially created in 1911, its initial wording was to create an offence to “obtain, collect, receive or communicate any information that might be or is intended to be useful to any enemy”.  It was updated in 1989 to mention that this information can be anything regarding security or intelligence, defence, international relations, and information which would assist a criminal or the commission of a crime.

It applies to everyone within the UK, not just those working within Government or those in journalistic roles.

The key fact that came out of the session, is that as a journalist, there is a chance of me coming into contact with this particular law, as there may be people who either are currently, or historically have been covered by the Official Secrets Act, and may pass information on, therefore breaking the law, and as a journalist, I would be assisting in this offence.

There have been instances where former Government employees have been prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act.

  • David Shayler – Charged in 2000 with 3 counts of breaking the Act, sentenced to 6 months imprisonment.
  • Richard Tomlinson – Charged in 1997 with 1 count of breaking the Act, sentenced to 12 months imprisonment
  • Edward Devenney – Charged in 2012 with 1 count of breaking the Act, sentenced to 8 years imprisonment.

A full copy of the Official Secrets Act is available to view from the Legislation Website

Cats Reflection 1 – Journalism Ethics – 23/09/15

Despite some events from the past few years, journalists to have ethical decisions to make in their daily lives, both in terms of day to day life, and in the stories that they are working on.

During the first CATS session, the group were given a scenario where a prominent figure in local politics had suffered the death of a close family member, and the question posed was about how to handle the situation of approaching the family, which is commonly known in the industry as a “death knock”.

My feelings on a “death knock” is that no matter how much you want the story, or how much pressure your editor is putting on you, ultimately it’s all about being tactful and putting yourself in that situation.  How would I want to be treated if this terrible situation was put into my life?

If the door was answered, then the key elements would be to be sympathetic, sensitive, fair, respectful, and to treat it as a member of the public losing a family member, rather than it being a prominent figure.  If the family were in, but had chosen not to answer the door, then the same rules would apply, but you would just be able to report the bare facts, which had been checked with multiple sources.  Leaving a note for the family to get in touch if and when they felt able to do so, would also be an olive branch.

From our scenario, the session moved to an online piece written for a hyperlocal website, which was reporting on a Traveller camp in Leeds.  The piece itself was a very biased piece of text, which was more rant than story.  One of the key mantras drilled into the first year, was to be fair, and to report on both sides of the story, even if one of the parties had refused to comment, or at the time of printing were unavailable for comment, it is ethically correct to state that.

The article made lots of assumptions and assertions, without course for recourse from the Traveller community.  In fact, the story didn’t mention any quoted sources at all.

Once this had been printed, there were a lot of comments from people in the community who were unhappy with the story from both sides of the fence, and even in the reply from the author, it was still a veiled attack on the community.

This session brings into focus the need for fair, balanced and accurate reporting that all journalists should adhere to, whether writing for national, local or hyperlocal news platforms.

After looking at these two stories, we were asked to consider the following question:  Are there any scenarios where phone hacking by a journalist is acceptable?  More about that next week.

CATS Assignment – Comparison of two influential journalists – Harvard Referencing

Harvard Referencing.

[Anderson, 2003] Communication, Conflict and Risk in the 21st Century: Critical Issues for Sociology, (2015). Communication, Conflict and Risk in the 21st Century: Critical Issues for Sociology. [online] Available at: http://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/4/anderson.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Controversial Images, 2012] Attwood, F., Campbell, V., Hunter, I. and Lockyer, S. (n.d.). Controversial images. Palgrave Schol, Print UK (1 Dec. 2012), p.280.

[BBC, 2002] Bbc.co.uk, (2002). BBC – Leicester Voices – Rageh Omaar revealed. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/leicester/voices/2002/06/rageh_omaar_revealed.shtml [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[BBC, 2003] News.bbc.co.uk, (2003). BBC NEWS | UK | Our man in Baghdad. [online] Available at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/3028179.stm [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[BBC, 2010] Birrell, D. (2010). BBC – Learning from Evil: Kate Adie’s story. [online] News.bbc.co.uk. Available at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/cornwall/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_8700000/8700130.stm [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[BBC, 2015] Bbc.co.uk, (2015). Caroline Wyatt – BBC News. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/correspondents/carolinewyatt [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Communications, B. (2015)]. The War You Don’t See. [online] Johnpilger.com. Available at: http://johnpilger.com/videos/the-war-you-dont-see [Accessed 9 May 2015].

[CredoReference, 2014] Adie, Kate (1945- ) (2014). [Online]. In The Hutchinson unabridged encyclopedia with atlas and weather guide. Abington, United Kingdom: Helicon. Available from: http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/heliconhe/adie_kate_1945/0 [Accessed 8 May 2015]

[Fox K, 2006] Fox, K. (2006). Rageh Omaar: ‘Idealism has become a dirty word among many journalists’. [online] the Guardian. Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/media/2011/nov/06/rageh-omaar-interview-slavery-evil [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Grice E, 2005] Grice, E. (2005). ‘I’m dead nosy. I love digging’. [online] Telegraph.co.uk. Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/donotmigrate/3646361/Im-dead-nosy.-I-love-digging.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Hodder & Stoughton, (2015)]. Kate Adie – Hodder & Stoughton. [online] Available at: https://www.hodder.co.uk/authors/detail.page?id=oHeL40rOpJjlfSAMDgS0higk19fQX3gdJNm32DocN5HXP1HUeX2DbQ__ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Independent, 2006] The Independent, (2006). Rageh Omaar: The Scud Stud aims for truth. [online] Available at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/rageh-omaar-the-scud-stud-aims-for-truth-478237.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[ITN, 2015] ITV News, (2015). Rageh Omaar – ITV News. [online] Available at: http://www.itv.com/news/meet-the-team/rageh-omaar/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[IWMF, 2011] Iwmf.org, (2011). IWMF Lifetime Achievement Award: Kate Adie, United Kingdom | IWMF. [online] Available at: http://www.iwmf.org/kate-adie-2011-lifetime-achievement-award/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Jardine, C. (2006)]. Why the pretty boy’s under fire again. [online] Telegraph.co.uk. Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/3652798/Why-the-pretty-boys-under-fire-again.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Kate Adie, BBC, 1989] Kate Adie, Tiananmen Square. (1989). [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrVZZQCiEXU [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Omaar, 2008] Omaar, R. (2008). The story that isn’t being told. [online] the Guardian. Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/media/2008/mar/17/iraqandthemedia.iraq [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Press Gazette, 2013] Pressgazette.co.uk, (2013). Rageh Omaar joins ITV News from Al Jazeera. [online] Available at: http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/rageh-omaar-joins-itv-news-al-jazeera [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Prime Performers, 2015]. Rageh Omaar. [online] Available at: http://www.primeperformersagency.co.uk/rageh-omaar/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Rageh Omaar, Baghdad 2003. (2003)]. [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57QXt1GsRfY [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Rock, 2013] Rock, W. (2013). Kate Adie: the BBC journalist on life, war and her new book. [online] Hampshire Chronicle. Available at: http://www.hampshirechronicle.co.uk/news/winchester/10852628.Kate_Adie__the_BBC_journalist_on_life__war_and_her_new_book/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Swan Hellenic, 2015] Swanhellenic.com, (2015). Speaker CV – Kate Adie. [online] Available at: http://www.swanhellenic.com/speaker-cv.html?speakerid=387 [Accessed 8 May 2015].

CATS Assignment – Comparison of Two influential journalists – 2nd Draft

Kate Adie and Rageh Omaar.

I have chosen these two journalists, as their careers have featured in news bulletins from my childhood through to my adult years.  Even though they were born in different parts of the world, educated differently, and started out in the media in different ways, their work has followed a similar path during conflicts and wars.

Kate Adie was born in Northumberland, England, and started her media career in local radio after completing her degree in Scandinavian Studies at Newcastle University.  Her first media roles came at BBC Radio Durham and BBC Radio Bristol, which led to a move into reporting for television on South Today in Southampton [Rock, 2013].  She then moved to cover network BBC News in 1979.  Her career with the BBC continued until 2003, and she covered various conflicts and battles around the world, as well as some closer to home. [Swan Helennic, CV]

She was the journalist outside the Iranian Embassy Hijacking when the Special Air Service (SAS) stormed the building after 6 days of stalemate in April and May 1980. This was a stepping stone for her, climbing the ranks within BBC News, eventually becoming Chief News Correspondent.  She covered significant stories at home including the downing of the Pan Am Flight 103, and around the world including the American Bombing of Libya, the First Gulf War, Bosnia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and the student uprising in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square before becoming a freelance journalist.[Rock, 2013]  During her time as a journalist, she was arrested in Belgrade trying to research and gather material about General Tito. [BBC, 2010]

Whereas Kate Adie was a prominent member of the BBC’s news team for the First Gulf War [IWMF, 2011], Rageh Omaar was a high profile journalist in the second Iraqi invasion.

Rageh Omaar was born in Mogadishu, Somalia in 1967, and moved to the UK, aged 2.  He was educated at New College Oxford, where he read Modern History.  His journalism journey started with print based The Voice as a trainee in 1991, and he moved to Ethiopia a year later, where he was a freelance journalist, mainly working for BBC World Service. His role for the BBC continued as Chief Correspondent for Africa, before the start of the Iraq Invasion. [BBC, 2002]

During that conflict, his coverage was seen in the UK on BBC News, and also around the world on BBC World News, further enhancing his reputation as Senior Foreign Correspondent.  After leaving the BBC in 2006, he worked for Al-Jazeera, [Independent, 2006] before returning to the UK in 2013, becoming special correspondent for Independent Television News (ITN), and is currently their International Affairs Editor. [ITN, 2015]

These two journalists have continued to help form and shape the way in which the journalists of today, cover conflicts, wars and uprisings from around the world.

Kate Adie blazed a trail for female journalists in general, but more especially within the confines of a war zone.  Prior to her career, women journalists were rarely seen in places such as The Gulf, Sardinia and Beijing, but thanks to her tough, no-nonsense approach, she was at the forefront of news reporting during her time at the BBC.

Adie uses her camera on the ground, and isn’t afraid to get in the crowds, as is demonstrated in her coverage from the student uprising in Tiananmen Square, Beijing. [Kate Adie, BBC, 1989] . By using very striking visuals shot on location, and her pieces to camera, she brought news events from around the world to an audience who were shocked by the events going on, whereas now, in 2015, audiences are more likely to be desensitized to the events that take place from across the world.  This is also true for Omaar, in his coverage of the toppling of Saddam Hussain’s statue in Baghdad.  Striking visuals, working with the crowd, whilst delivering a piece to camera. [Rageh Omaar, Baghdad 2003]

Her voiceover pieces use elaborate, some would say, flowery language, but this is to add depth and gravitas to the images recorded and are delivered in a very calm voice.  Whereas her pieces recorded in front of the camera, have her voice much stronger in its delivery, to get across to the audience the severity of the situation that is being covered.

Earlier in her career, Adie covered the US bombing of Tripoli in Libya, and she is seen reporting from the scene of a bombing, wearing very little protection in terms of flak jackets and armour.  She tries to get across to the audience the human element of, what is a very grave situation, where people have been injured and have died, bringing it to the sitting rooms of the audience.  This is in stark contrast to Omaar, who wore full protection, but Health and Safety has become a part of video journalism.

As Kate Adie was coming to the end of her BBC career, and moving into freelance work and becoming an author, Rageh Omaar was being seen covering his own stories, firstly as the BBC’s Africa correspondent, but it was with the start of the second Gulf War in 2003, that Omaar started to become a regular face on news coverage for the BBC, which was then subsequently syndicated around the world. [Fox, K, 2006]

Omaar was keen to deny reports that he was the new Kate Adie, he recognised the similarity in their roles, but simply replied “I don’t know about that. But I’m not the old Rageh Omaar.” [BBC, 2003]

Rageh Omaar’s brand of journalism was refreshing for the time, in the same way that Adie brought her own perspective to reporting.

Being of African parentage, his understanding of issues from other parts of the world was a great asset to understanding other cultures and their customs, and allowed him to access areas that may have been more difficult to other journalists.  As he is fluent in Arabic, this undoubtedly helped to communicate with the Iraqis during the conflict.[BBC, 2002]

His journalism style is very similar to that of Kate Adie, in that he is willing to get in amongst the battles, attempting to tell the story in a way that is very accessible to the audience, and does not speak down to the viewer.

In a piece for the BBC, the way in which Omaar covers a story, the toppling of the statue of Saddam Hussain in Fardus Square, Baghdad, in a very calm and measured way, even though the crowd around him are visibly excited by the events that are about to occur.

Omaar and Adie reflect on their time covering the Gulf Wars with a sense of frustration.  Adie is quoted as saying “I’ve seen a complete erosion of any kind of acknowledgement that reporters should be able to report as they witness” [Anderson, 2003], and Omaar talked in 2008 of Iraq as a “a contradiction – it is still the most important international news story, but the continuing violence and insecurity have also made it an information abyss.” [Omaar, 2008]

Frustration at attempting to tell a story, when you’re not being given all the information you require.  The socio-political impact of this is that the audience are being fed only half the story, and by showing positive propaganda, it makes the war on the ground seem better than the actual truth may be.  A situation similar to the Vietnam War, and the footage being shown to the US audience.

These two journalists have come from very different backgrounds, but there does seem to be a hard-nosed attitude to provide the viewer with hard-hitting journalism, even if they may seem frustrated by the control held over them by the Armed Forces, and maybe even a little bit of editorial control by their then employer. [Controversial Images, 2012]

Their backgrounds are worth reflecting on, to see where these tough, investigative journalists started out from, to see if this has had any effect on where they are today.

Adie was given up for adoption by her mother, after falling pregnant whilst her husband was away doing his National Service.  Her adoptive parents, were a pharmacist and his wife from the northern city of Sunderland, England.  During her childhood, she was described as a shy child, but this may have in part, been due to her deafness. [Grice, E, 2005]

Omaar was born into a wealthy family from Somaliland, which is in the north-west of Somalia.  He moved to the UK aged 2, and was educated in independent schools in Oxford and Gloucester, England. [Prime Performers, 2015]

Their formative years don’t seem to have much correlation, but what stands out in their careers, is their ability to find stories, bring them to the audience, and, to a certain degree, being in the right place at the right time.

These two correspondents worked just a few years apart, but the way in which news is reported has changed.  The news outlets for Kate Adie were the lunchtime and evening bulletins, where as with Rageh Omaar, the horizon had changed, with news coverage being accessible 24 hours a day via BBC News 24, and also around the world, as his work was syndicated in America.  Their paths to video news journalism started from very different media, Adie taking the radio route to television, and Omaar starting in print journalism, but they both ended up in the same places reporting the facts. [BBC, 2010 Adie] [BBC, 2002 Omaar]

What stands out is that their ideals still hold true, no matter what their starting point.  They just wanted to relate the story to the audience, even though it was from many corners of the world that the audience may not have in-depth knowledge about.  The willingness to put their lives and safety at risk to cover a story, is what drives and connects these two journalists.

They are also linked by the outlet of story telling away from traditional journalism.  Both have become authors in their own right, Adie writing about the role of women in World War 1,[Hodder & Stoughton 2015] and Omaar describing his life growing up as a Muslim and writing about his experiences in Iraq. [Jardine, 2006]

Their names are held in reverence in journalism circles, and the current crop of journalists covering these stories today have a lot to live up to in terms of content, guts and determination to show the true nature of war and war zones.

When viewing their work, you can see that they work to get across how grave a situation is, with careful use of crowd scenes, showing the troops on the ground if possible, and speak directly to the camera, but ensuring that they relate the situation to the audience, rather than just lecturing.

By relating that situation, they work with the local people, attempting to get their side of the story, if that is possible, given that they are embedded with the soldiers fighting the battle.

Like so many journalists before them, and, no doubt other journalists to come, their passion for telling a story in a way that is accessible by the general public.  The British troops on the ground in the war zones were quoted as saying that if Kate Adie was being sent to cover the story, then things were being perceived as a very serious situation.

Rageh Omaar is a journalist who, is held in the same esteem. He is a journalist that has gone from a Black African newspaper, to covering stories from around the world, and his work with the BBC, ITN, and Al-Jazeera is one that the great John Pilger covered in his documentary “The War You Don’t See”. [Communications B, 2015]

Their work still holds gravitas throughout the journalism world, and drives many journalists on today. to ensure that the truth is reported, in a fair, accurate and contemporaneous way to the widest possible audience.

They both treat the subject with humanity and respect, and also extend that courtesy to the audience. Their ability to look objectively at some of the most horrific situations from around the world, come across when viewing news broadcast footage from their careers.

However, they both felt compelled to leave the BBC, where their work came to prominence, to forge their own paths

Their work is so well-respected within the industry, that they were able to carve out their reputation as names of great war journalists and correspondents, and that their names were known for being great journalists, rather than just being BBC journalists who happened to be sent to cover the wars and conflicts. [Press Gazette, 2013 Omaar] [CredoReference, 2014 Adie]

A true journalist always wants to convey the truth to the audience, and these two journalists have inspired me over the years with their work around the world.  By facing difficult situations, and bringing their humanity across via the camera and their written words, many have followed their work intently.

Their work, continues to inspire and help to shape the journalists and reporters as the media moves forward with established 24 hour news, the constant updating of online news and the increased use of social media.    For example, when viewing the work of Caroline Wyatt at the BBC, you see the influence that Omaar and Adie have had on the style and presentation of the news pieces. [BBC, 2015].

Without their influence, reporting, comment and help to shape the journalists of the future, the sociopolitical impact of wars and conflicts wouldn’t be as striking.  In news reporting today, you see skills and techniques these two journalists pioneered many years ago. The audience, reporters and correspondents are able to learn from their work for many years to come.

Word Count – 1998

Harvard Referencing.

[Anderson, 2003] Communication, Conflict and Risk in the 21st Century: Critical Issues for Sociology, (2015). Communication, Conflict and Risk in the 21st Century: Critical Issues for Sociology. [online] Available at: http://www.socresonline.org.uk/8/4/anderson.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Controversial Images, 2012] Attwood, F., Campbell, V., Hunter, I. and Lockyer, S. (n.d.). Controversial images. Palgrave Schol, Print UK (1 Dec. 2012), p.280.

[BBC, 2002] Bbc.co.uk, (2002). BBC – Leicester Voices – Rageh Omaar revealed. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/leicester/voices/2002/06/rageh_omaar_revealed.shtml [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[BBC, 2003] News.bbc.co.uk, (2003). BBC NEWS | UK | Our man in Baghdad. [online] Available at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/3028179.stm [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[BBC, 2010] Birrell, D. (2010). BBC – Learning from Evil: Kate Adie’s story. [online] News.bbc.co.uk. Available at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/cornwall/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_8700000/8700130.stm [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[BBC, 2015] Bbc.co.uk, (2015). Caroline Wyatt – BBC News. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/correspondents/carolinewyatt [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Communications, B. (2015)]. The War You Don’t See. [online] Johnpilger.com. Available at: http://johnpilger.com/videos/the-war-you-dont-see [Accessed 9 May 2015].

[CredoReference, 2014] Adie, Kate (1945- ) (2014). [Online]. In The Hutchinson unabridged encyclopedia with atlas and weather guide. Abington, United Kingdom: Helicon. Available from: http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/heliconhe/adie_kate_1945/0 [Accessed 8 May 2015]

[Fox K, 2006] Fox, K. (2006). Rageh Omaar: ‘Idealism has become a dirty word among many journalists’. [online] the Guardian. Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/media/2011/nov/06/rageh-omaar-interview-slavery-evil [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Grice E, 2005] Grice, E. (2005). ‘I’m dead nosy. I love digging’. [online] Telegraph.co.uk. Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/donotmigrate/3646361/Im-dead-nosy.-I-love-digging.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Hodder & Stoughton, (2015)]. Kate Adie – Hodder & Stoughton. [online] Available at: https://www.hodder.co.uk/authors/detail.page?id=oHeL40rOpJjlfSAMDgS0higk19fQX3gdJNm32DocN5HXP1HUeX2DbQ__ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Independent, 2006] The Independent, (2006). Rageh Omaar: The Scud Stud aims for truth. [online] Available at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/rageh-omaar-the-scud-stud-aims-for-truth-478237.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[ITN, 2015] ITV News, (2015). Rageh Omaar – ITV News. [online] Available at: http://www.itv.com/news/meet-the-team/rageh-omaar/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[IWMF, 2011] Iwmf.org, (2011). IWMF Lifetime Achievement Award: Kate Adie, United Kingdom | IWMF. [online] Available at: http://www.iwmf.org/kate-adie-2011-lifetime-achievement-award/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Jardine, C. (2006)]. Why the pretty boy’s under fire again. [online] Telegraph.co.uk. Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/3652798/Why-the-pretty-boys-under-fire-again.html [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Kate Adie, BBC, 1989] Kate Adie, Tiananmen Square. (1989). [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrVZZQCiEXU [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Omaar, 2008] Omaar, R. (2008). The story that isn’t being told. [online] the Guardian. Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/media/2008/mar/17/iraqandthemedia.iraq [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Press Gazette, 2013] Pressgazette.co.uk, (2013). Rageh Omaar joins ITV News from Al Jazeera. [online] Available at: http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/rageh-omaar-joins-itv-news-al-jazeera [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Prime Performers, 2015]. Rageh Omaar. [online] Available at: http://www.primeperformersagency.co.uk/rageh-omaar/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Rageh Omaar, Baghdad 2003. (2003)]. [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57QXt1GsRfY [Accessed 8 May 2015].

[Rock, 2013] Rock, W. (2013). Kate Adie: the BBC journalist on life, war and her new book. [online] Hampshire Chronicle. Available at: http://www.hampshirechronicle.co.uk/news/winchester/10852628.Kate_Adie__the_BBC_journalist_on_life__war_and_her_new_book/ [Accessed 8 May 2015].

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Video Presentation – Emma Massey – Additional Footage

After the feedback from Emma last week, a couple of the points that needed changing were the number of general video clips to build the scene in and around Hatfield and Stainforth, and also to have another attempt to get Vox Pops from the public.

Screenshot from Colliery Video

Screenshot from Colliery Video

Well 1 out of 2, was disappointing, but given the reaction last week, not entirely a surprise.  The general set-up shots of the area were easy to do, even in the blustery wind, but the public were willing to speak to me, but sadly not on camera.

As I’ve now got the necessary set-up background shots, I can head to the edit suite early tomorrow morning to re-jig the video, export it, and send it off to be assessed.

It’s been a learning process to keep on with things, and keep watching news production to learn more about the skills required to do Video Journalism.  I’ve even started to critically analyse any piece on local news to see what they have done, and not done!

CATS Reflection – Walter Astrada

Walter Astrada

Walter Astrada

 

Argentinian by birth, Walter Astrada is a video journalist who highlights tough issues in some of the world’s poorest communities.

His award-winning work is certainly not mainstream, so until the CATS session, I have to admit, I hadn’t come across his work, but I feel richer for the experience.

Covering countries as diverse as Kenya, Madagascar, Haiti, and Uganda, Astrada’s work is hard-hitting, and is, in some cases, shocking.

The documentary viewed in the session was Undesired, which is the story of Indian families who strive to have male children, and the pain and suffering that women go through if it is found that their unborn, or newborn child is of the female gender.

With strong video, and text slides that are short and to the point, the documentary style is to shock, but not so much that you feel able to turn away from the content.  It is the exact opposite of that, leaving you with a need to learn more about the subject, and the socio-political impact of this position by Indian families to attempt to change the makeup of the gender balance.

As I mentioned, Walter’s work isn’t mainstream, and you’re unlikely to find it being covered on the evening news, but for me, it proves that tough subject matters can be covered sensitively, and with compassion.  As a 40-year-old man, Walter is of a similar age to myself, and his courage and drive to showcase these communities, drives me on to help other communities in the UK and around the world.

The way in which he portrays his subjects can be strong, but is not in a way that is patronising to the audience or the people he works with.  He just wants to tell the story in the best way that he can.

His ability to gain access to an issue that is illegal in India, but one that is widely encouraged by families, deserves more credit, and hopefully people will be more aware of his work going forward.

By being introduced to his work, I will analyse the way in which Astrada uses his camera work, the way he uses angles, lighting and interviews, to tell the story, and bring that to my productions to audiences a little closer to home.